2021 Summer Workshop: The Education Opportunity – Primary Sources and Context in the K-12 Classroom

Thursday, July 8, 2021, 1:00-4:00 PM (EST)

Virtual workshop on Zoom

Registration: $25

This workshop is for archivists and custodians of primary source materials who wish to increase the visibility and sound use of their holdings to educators. Participants will engage with multiple primary sources from a single collection to learn how to connect archival literacy with the creation of turnkey resources for educators. This workshop will help custodians of primary sources think critically about their collections as they relate to state education curriculum standards and broaden their potential K-12 audience. Participants will learn of unique strategies and resources currently applied in the classroom from the teachers who are currently using them as a means to foster discussion regarding how archival outreach might be enhanced at the K-12 level.    

Instructor: Amanda Smith, Jena Sibille, Mike Santrock

Register here

Podcasts, an Underutilized Tool for Archives?

By Megan Kerkhoff, SGA Assistant Communications Director

Podcasts have been on the rise for the past decade, gaining more downloads every day. They are short episodic audio shows that can cover various topics including, true crime, cooking, celebrities, entertainment, and lifestyle, just to name a few. Podcasts are surprisingly easy to create and consume, making them a great tool for promotion. There are several podcasts that utilize archives to tell history, but there are also podcasts produced by archivists to promote their institutions. How do they go about producing podcasts and can they be an attainable promotional tool for any institution?

Below meet Lolita Rowe, Community Outreach Archivist at Emory University’s Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archive, and Rare Book Library, where she gives some sage words of advice on starting a podcast and how it is beneficial to promote archival institutions. The Rose Library currently has three podcasts with multiple episodes already available for downloading, so we asked Lolita how and why she went about creating podcasts for the archives.


How and when did the idea for creating a podcast at your institution come about?

Podcasting as an outreach tool for archives has been on my mind for a while. When I started my position in 2018, I was asked what I wanted to do first. I proposed a podcast. A podcast can be consumed at any time the person who is listening can digest the information. An archives podcast could reach an audience of people who may have never set foot in one before but would be interested in the stories we have about the collections.

I didn’t know what it would look like, but I was inspired by LeVar Burton Reads Live show in Atlanta. Reading Rainbow was my childhood. It created awe, but curiosity and it inspired me to learn. I wanted to do the same for archives, to demystify them and introduce them to people who have never set foot in one, as well as people who may not know what materials the Rose has in its collection.

I knew that others outside of our profession have been doing podcasts, so instead of reinventing the wheel, I wanted to learn how the wheel turned. I went to a Podcast Convention PodX, now PodCon, and purchased a ticket that allowed me to learn from the different podcasters at the convention. I got to speak with the creators and talents behind popular shows like Welcome to Nightvale, Lore, and The History Chicks. When I told them the premise of my show, they were supportive and thought it was a great idea.

I had the idea, but I did not have the tech background until Poetry and Digital Humanities Librarian, Nick Twemlow, was hired. The idea for one podcast morphed into two shows. One that would answer the question, “What is an Archive?,” which became Rose Library Presents: Behind the Archive. The second show would be a conversation about a historical person, event, or place connected to Rose Library collections, which we turned into Rose Library Presents: Community Conversations.

How do you prepare to record a podcast? Any important tools to invest in? Is it nerve wracking?

Photograph provided by Lolita Rowe

To answer your last question first, it is nerve wracking when you first start. Then you have the first tech issue or a global pandemic that changes how you thought things would go, and you realize, you got this. Mistakes happen and can lead to a better show. I recorded episodes for both podcasts in February 2020, then the global pandemic gave us a chance to rework how we would move forward. We discovered a platform called Squadcast that allows people to connect anywhere they have access to the internet.  It also led to our colleague, Randy Gue, Assistant Director and Curator of Social and Political Movements, to use the framework and guidelines that Nick and I wrote, to create a third show in our suite of podcasts, Rose Library Presents: Atlanta Intersections. The shows were launched in October 2020 for Archives Month and we have continued to grow our audience ever since.

This delay led us to an amazing editor who could handle any issues we have with sound, since I have been recording in my home’s closet since episode two. Yes, we have Audacity, a free tool, but having an editor who understands how to fix sound levels or give us tips on the backend has been instrumental in our show. We also have Emory Center for Digital Scholarship Lab, who have been extremely helpful with guests who work on campus and can interview in their sound booth. But most of our interviews have happened in our guests’ homes.

The tech has been the most interesting component. The questions feel like a reference interview or an oral history interview. I have prepared questions that we loosely base the interview on, but the interview is about the guest.  I send out an email before the interview with a list of questions, I ask if there is a project or organization they want to highlight and tell them what to expect the day of the interview. The day of the interview we start when they are ready, and once we begin, we have a conversation more than an interview.

Do you think a podcast is attainable for any archival institution to implement? And do you have any tips for podcast beginners?

I think it can be. There is some cost associated with starting a podcast, but podcasts can be as inexpensive or expensive as you make it.  You just need good quality equipment and software. And good quality is not the most expensive microphone. You can use your phone, or your computer’s microphone. Yes, a real microphone is better, but you can start small and build up. Below are some other things to think about as well:

  • Quiet place to record (HVAC hum will also be audible)
  • Recording device (Cell phone, Zoom H4N Recorder, computer)
  • Microphone (Will need an omnidirectional microphone if recording with one mic and two people)
  • Computer for editing
  • Program for editing (Audacity or Audition)
  • For editing, we mostly use Audacity, which is free to download. There are great tutorials online, which are needed.

I think anyone can start a podcast if they have the support to do so. I planned how I wanted to record the shows, when I wanted to record, and my timeline and guest list were thrown out the window in March 2020. Be flexible and adjust to your circumstances. The most imperfect moments are the best.

Do you have any favorite archives and non-archives related podcasts to listen to?

Lore, LeVar Burton Reads, Smartless, The History Chicks, Welcome to Nightvale, Why Won’t You Date Me? with Nicole Byer, and I keep downloading more each day.

Interested in Rose Library’s Podcasts? See the links below!

Rose Library Presents https://rose.library.emory.edu/research-learning/rose-library-presents.html

Behind the Archives https://rose-btarch.transistor.fm/

Community Conversations https://rose-commcon.transistor.fm/

Atlanta Intersections https://rose-atlint.transistor.fm/


Thanks to Lolita Rowe for satisfying our curiosity and helping us to better understand how podcasts are made from the archives. Let’s continue to promote our archives in fun and innovative ways!

Let us know some of your favorite podcasts about or produced by archives in the comments!

Reach out to us at communications@soga.org.

Submit a blog post here.

SGA Coffee Chat April 21 at 2pm ET

Join the Nominating Committee for an SGA Leadership Coffee Chat with current SGA board members Wednesday, April 21 at 2 pm ET. This will be the second in a series of conversations about opportunities for professional contribution and career development within our organization. If you’re interested in finding out more about leadership opportunities with SGA, please tune in to learn more, ask questions, and find out how your skills can benefit your colleagues around the state! 

Click here to register.

Women of Atlanta Collections Now Processed and Available to Researchers

by Kate Daly and Leah Lefkowitz, Visual Culture Archivist and Manuscript Archivist, Atlanta History Center

In June 2020, the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center received funding from a private donor to complete a project to catalog and process over 30 linear feet of archival materials related to Atlanta’s women’s history. Archivists have completed processing several collections, allowing these historically significant materials to be widely available to researchers.

The Atlanta History Center will use these materials, as well as others related to women’s history in our collection, to curate an online exhibition. We are also soliciting new donations from prominent Atlanta women. These materials will facilitate public research and provide support for the Atlanta History Center’s programs and exhibitions.

The following collections have been processed and are now available on the Kenan Research Center’s Finding Aids database (https://ahc.galileo.usg.edu/):

– Atlanta Tomboys documents, MSS 1204, 1917-1926, 1944-1986, undated

This collection contains papers that document the Atlanta Tomboys, an amateur, later semi-professional, women’s basketball and softball team, both organized and coached by Johnny Moon. Included are game schedules, team rosters, promotional materials, and correspondence about sports scholarships and exhibits.

– Atlanta Women’s Chamber of Commerce photographs, VIS 398, 1952-1989

This collection contains images and items related to the Women’s Chamber of Commerce of Atlanta’s outreach activities and members. Included are photographs, negatives, and slides of annual events and contests, as well as WCC members and officers, meetings, and committees.

– Atlanta Women’s Network records, MSS 710, 1978-1989, undated

This collection contains documents from the Atlanta Women’s Network, an outgrowth of the Feminist Action Alliance, that brings together professional Atlanta women through tools and relationship building. Areas of the organization documented include the Board of Directors, committee creation and work, luncheon and other event planning, and business operations.

– Cathy Woolard papers, 1986-2013, undated

This collection documents the career of Atlanta City Council Woman Cathy Woolard, who was the first openly gay elected official in the position, which she held from 1997 until 2002 Papers include campaign flyers, voter surveys, press clippings of her work, legal paperwork, and administrative binders. The bulk of documentation is planning materials pertaining to the construction of the Atlanta Beltline, such as financial and environmental studies, formal presentations, and outreach magazines and publications.

– Chris Mastin photographs of protest marches, VIS 399, 2017-2018

This collection contains digital images taken by Chris Mastin of the March for Science Atlanta, the Martin Luther King Jr. March and Rally in Atlanta, and the Women’s March on Washington. Photographs in this collection depict protesters holding signs and marching in downtown Atlanta and Washington D.C.

– Emily Bourne Grigsby papers and photographs, MSS 1201, 1943-2004, undated

These collections contain documents and photographs from Emily Bourne Grigsby’s career as an opera singer and model, as well as her time as president of the Atlanta Music Club and her association with the Atlanta Opera Arts Association.

– Florence Inman photographs, VIS 389, 1970-1990, undated

This collection contains photographs of Focal Point Inc.’s awards and recognitions, the staff and workshop, and the moldings they designed and manufactured. Examples of moldings and decorative medallions are shown that were manufactured in the Focal Point workshop, or installed in residences and historic properties.

– Leila Ross Wilburn visual arts materials, VIS 72, 1920-1979

This collection documents the prolific work of one of Atlanta’s pioneer women architects and businesswomen. It is comprised primarily of architectural plans, photographs, negatives, and slides of private residences, multi-family homes, and apartment buildings Wilburn designed during her career.

– Lochrane and Reid family papers, MSS 1203, 1833-1977, undated

This collection contains papers from the Lochrane and Reid family, primarily Sallie Fannie Reid, the funder a Confederate military company during the Civil War and the secretary of the Ladies of Soldiers Relief. The bulk of the collection is correspondence written by Reid

– Lucinda Bunnen photographs, VIS 395, approximately 1976-1978

This collection contains photographs taken for Movers and Shakers in Georgia by Lucinda Bunnen and Frankie Coxe. The collection includes images of notable political, business, cultural, and arts figures between 1976-1978 in Georgia. Also included are photographs of events such as Jimmy Carter’s presidential election, a Decatur Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) planning meeting, the Ramblin’ Raft Race on the Chattahoochee River, an Atlanta Symphony Orchestra concert in Piedmont Park, Atlanta Braves baseball team opening days, and Isamu Noguchi’s Playscapes opening event in Piedmont Park.

– Maria Helena Dolan papers, MSS 1196, 1970-2007, undated

This collection contains materials collected by Maria Helena Dolan that document her work in LGBTQ+ and feminist organizations, her personal life, events she attended, her work at MARTA, as well her various other interests, including gardening, arts, and travel. Specific causes documented include AIDS awareness and safe sex, domestic violence, civil rights, and LGBTQ+ rights. Organizations represented include Atlanta History Center, Charis Books & More, Pride, ACLU, and Atlanta Lesbian and Gay History Thing, amongst others.

– Roan family papers, MSS 1202, 1913-1971, undated

This collection documents the Roan family, including Margaret Zattau Roan, who was a suffragist, activist, and pioneering music therapist. Suffragist papers consist of telegrams to the Convention League of Women Voters, articles, and documents from the National League of Women Voters

– Yolande Copley Gwin visual arts materials, MSS 1202, 1913-1971, undated

This collection contains illustrations submitted to the society column that Yolande Copley Gwin edited at the Atlanta Journal. Editorial cartoonists featured in the collection include Clifford “Baldy” Baldowski (1917-1999), Lou “Eric” Erickson (1913-1990), Howard Paris (1919-2004), and others.

SGA Coffee Chat March 17 2pm ET

Image reads Join us for a Leadership Coffee Chat with Past and Current SGA Presidents. Wednesday, March 17 2 PM Eastern Time. RSVP via the Link Provided

Join the Nominating Committee for an SGA Leadership Coffee Chat with past and current SGA presidents on March 17 at 2 pm ET. This will be the first in a series of conversations about opportunities for professional contribution and career development within our organization. If you’re interested in finding out more about leadership opportunities with SGA, please tune in to learn more, ask questions, and find out how your skills can benefit your colleagues around the state! 

Click here to register.

Press Release: The Jewish Community of Atlanta (Arcadia, 2021)

The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum is proud to announce the publication of a new book on the history of Jewish Atlanta. Images of America: The Jewish Community of Atlanta, authored by the museum’s own Senior Director of Archives, Jeremy Katz, released by Arcadia Publishing on January 25th, 2021.

Courtesy of the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum and available wherever books are sold

Utilizing the Ida Pearle and Joseph Cuba Archives for Southern Jewish History at the Breman as the main source of images, the book illustrates through 200 images the visionary leaders in the Jewish community that helped Atlanta evolve from a sleepy, backwater, 19th-century frontier railroad town into the 21st-century international metropolis we know today. It also chronicles the dark episodes of blatant antisemitism that traumatized the community and had national implications, such as the lynching of Leo M. Frank, The Temple Bombing, and the deliberate expulsion of Jewish students from Emory University Dental School.

The book is part of a larger initiative to make the archives at the Breman more accessible than ever before. In addition to the book, the museum recently soft-launched a Google Arts & Culture page that features an online exhibition and 100 high-resolution images of historic photographs, documents, and objects. To explore the page, please visit https://bit.ly/3e4X5Aj. The full launch of the page, which will feature hundreds more artifacts and several additional online exhibitions, will come alongside a larger city-wide rollout showcasing the Breman together with many of Atlanta’s prestigious museums and arts institutions.

Another major facet of this larger initiative is a complete overhaul of the museum’s collection catalog to industry leading systems. This 21st century upgrade puts the Breman on par with leading archival institutions around the country. To explore the new and innovative oral history catalog, please visit: http://bit.ly/37Gkw2e.

In addition to these exciting projects, the archives at the Breman is also presenting virtual programs that are attracting on average 250 participants per event. For more information about upcoming events, please visit: https://www.thebreman.org/Events.

About the Author

Jeremy Katz holds degrees from The Ohio State University and Wright State University as well as a certification from the Academy of Certified Archivists. He currently serves as the Senior Director of Archives at the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum in Atlanta, Georgia. The images featured in this book have been carefully curated from the photography collections in the Ida Pearle and Joseph Cuba Archives for Southern Jewish History at the Breman Museum, the largest repository for Jewish research in the American South.

ISBN: 978-1-4671-0585-9
Price: $21.99
Available wherever books are sold or online at https://bit.ly/3bF8k4M.

New Exhibition: RE-COR-DARE: SAUDA MITCHELL

April 16, 2021 to February 27, 2022

Jepson Center at the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA

Re-Cor-Dare is a solo art exhibition of Society of Georgia Archivists member and artist Sauda Mitchell (American, b. 1981).

About the exhibition:

“Mitchell’s prints, paintings, and artist books serve as compelling visual responses to her sustained engagement with archival collection materials. In researching personal papers, photographs, artifacts, and curated digital collections, her work explores thematic topics of study relating to the Black experience. Utilizing QR codes, selected works link to digitized collection materials focusing on their ability as teaching tools recalling stories embedded within the African American collective memory.

The hyphenated title, Re-Cor-Dare, calls attention to the definition of the word “record” through its Latin roots―explicitly “Cor” (heart) and “Dare” (to give). Through five distinct but interconnecting series, Mitchell traces the legacies of slavery in the United States from the Middle Passage to present-day social injustices faced by Black Americans. Ultimately, her work exists as a catalyst for discussion, reflection, and a celebration of the human spirit.”

Learn more and see some of Sauda’s works by visiting: https://www.telfair.org/exhibitions/re-cor-dare-sauda-mitchell/

Let’s Advocate!

As archivists, we know that advocating for our profession is a crucial part of our work. The Academy of Certified Archivists includes advocacy within one of the seven main domains of the archival profession. ACA explains that archivists must “develop an understanding of, and support for, the archival program among resource allocators, key constituents, potential donors, allied professionals, and other internal and external stakeholders to the archives’ parent organization” (ACA Exam Handbook 21). Advocating for our profession can take many forms – public programming, meetings with local and state politicians, donor relations, fundraising, activism, etc. For the Society of Georgia Archivists, activism kicked into high gear roughly five years ago when the future of the Georgia Archives was in danger. Now that this threat has passed, it is time to start thinking about advocacy in a long-term sense. While issue-based advocacy is important, it is also necessary to engage in a steady rhythm of advocacy so that our community understands the value of what we do.
The SGA Outreach Team has made it a point to focus on advocacy for fall 2017. We are excited to see the inroads we can make in Georgia to help inform our community of the archival profession. Here are some ideas we are considering…
        Developing an advocacy “workflow” for current and future members of the SGA Outreach Team
        Setting up meetings with our local and state politicians to discuss our purpose as archivists
        Inviting stakeholders to SGA events
        Targeting SGA social media to address issues specifically related to advocacy   
SGA Members with Governor Nathan Deal at the 2016 Georgia Archives Month Proclamation Signing

What other ideas do you have for advocacy? Let us know!!

We’re Back!

Greetings all!

The  SGA Outreach team is excited to announce that we are officially reviving our blog! Thank you for your patience during our hiatus.

Our first blog post is going to focus on membership. Membership is crucial to the success of SGA because without dedicated members who volunteer their time and resources to serve on the SGA board, attend SGA events and meetings, mentor one another, or even just promote the archival endeavor in Georgia, our Society could not exist. You do not have to be a full-time archivist to be a member of SGA. Anyone can join. We welcome a diverse group of members who are committed to working together for the betterment of archives in our state. In fact, the SGA Diversity Initiative Task Force just completed the first statement on diversity and inclusion for SGA. Check it out here.

The SGA Membership Committee specifically works toward meeting the needs of current SGA members as well as recruiting new members. The Outreach Committee works closely with the Membership Committee to plan events and campaigns to encourage membership participation. Take a look at the latest update from Sarah Tanner, the 2017 SGA Membership Chair:

Dear SGA Members,
The Membership Committee, in 2016, began working closely with the Outreach Committee to combine our efforts to help support current SGA membership and expand our reach in recruiting new members. We have had three joint meetings to plan and promote SGA activities for the 2017 year. The Membership Committee has several ongoing tasks, including welcoming new members, planning tours of Georgia repositories, connecting members through social and networking events, and partnering with the Mentoring Committee to identify ways to connect new members with the Mentoring Program. This year the Membership Committee planned a joint Lego+Local Brew networking event with the Special Libraries Association and other professional organizations at the Museum of Modern Design, sent informational emails to historical societies, faculty, and students in archival programs, and is working on several upcoming events for the summer. The Membership Committee, along with the Outreach Committee is working with the Georgia Archives Institute to plan a repository tour of the Auburn Avenue Research Center in June and an SGA member happy hour at the Brick Store Pub this summer. Stay tuned for more information about these upcoming events.
In addition to these events, committee members have been working on a variety of tasks from SGA’s Strategic Timetable, including drafting and submitting a Diversity Statement for the SGA Board, and reaching out to members in other areas of Georgia to plan casual meet-ups in cities beyond Atlanta. If you or anyone you know is interested in working with the Membership Committee to plan an event in your area, please contact me!

The Membership Committee is designed to work on programs to recruit and retain members, as well as develop membership benefits. If you have any feedback, comments, or concerns, I would love to hear from you.  

Thanks for the update, Sarah! And to all of our SGA members, thank you for making us the incredible Society that we are!