SGA Summer Workshop: Register Now

Reparative Description from Two Sides: Cataloging and Processing

Thursday, June 23, 2022, 12:30-4:00 PM (EST)

Location: Zoom

This workshop is for archivists and special collection librarians who wish to increase their abilities in limiting harmful language in their organization’s finding aids and catalog records through reparative description. This workshop will help archivists and librarians to identify and build upon best practices in description and cataloging to create policy, guidelines, and implement reparative description in their own organizations. Discussion leaders will present on prominent topics and issues, and participants will learn how to approach description, identify authoritative organizations and documentation, and discuss situations with leaders in this work as well other learners through the roundtable discussion.

Instructors: Beth Shoemaker and Tierra Thomas

Moderator: Laura Starratt

Beth Shoemaker is the Rare Book Librarian at Emory University’s Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archive & Rare Book Library in Atlanta. Her work includes cataloging, collection development, teaching and curating exhibits in the Emory Libraries. Her research interests include how practicing catalogers approach ethics in the workplace. Since its formation in 2018, she has been co-chair of the Cataloging Ethics Steering Committee, which released a final draft of the Cataloguing Code of Ethics in January 2021. Beth is a graduate of the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science.

Tierra Thomas is an early career archivist living in Decatur, Georgia. She earned her MSLS at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – School of Information and Library Science. As an undergraduate, she studied History and African American Studies at Georgia State University. Most recently she finished her contract term as Visiting Archivist for Southern Jewish Collections at Emory University. She has served as a member of the Anti-Oppressive Language Working Group at Emory University’s Rose Library and the Conscious Editing Steering Committee at UNC-CH’s Wilson Library. Her research focuses on social justice and equity and centering those ideals in an archival setting.

Register here.

Georgia State University Oral History Symposium Happening September 25

Interested in oral history? Georgia State University is hosting the first ever Oral History Symposium, Uncovering Hidden Narratives, on Saturday, September 25th from 9am to 5pm. The symposium was organized by oral historians from Atlanta History Center, Center for Civil and Human Rights, Emory University, Georgia State University, Kennesaw State University, National Park Service, Oral History Association, Storycorps, University of Georgia, and We Love Buford Highway. The symposium will kick off with keynote speaker Althea Sumpter with her talk centered on trauma in oral histories. Throughout the day attendees can choose sessions that best suit their needs and interests for those that are just beginning or thinking about starting an oral history project to those that are part of established programs. We will wrap up with a meet and greet where attendees can network with other attendees and organizations who support and manage oral history projects.

Maximum capacity for this event is 75 registrants. Masks are strongly encouraged to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Register here.

We need a minimum of 25 registrations by September 10th in order for the program to proceed. All registrants will be notified by September 15th if the event cannot be held as planned and will be reimbursed for their registration costs.

Also, if you are knowledgeable about oral history yourself and would like to help, we are still looking for presenters in these areas:

Intermediate 

People with some experience in oral history (e.g. may have done interviews but may have not coordinated a project). They know what they don’t know. Sessions should present a skill that participants can begin practicing and perfecting. 

  • Funding (grants, Foundations, Federal) 
    • Creating a fundraising plan 

Advanced 

Experienced in oral history. Done many interviews and maybe some projects in the past. Don’t know what they really know (i.e. have lots of oral history practice but not much reflection on the process). Sessions should present a question for discussion. 

  • Beyond the University 
    • Use of oral history in non-academic efforts (e.g. corporate and community) 
    • Combination of academic, corporate, and/or community projects 
    • How much should funders control or have input into project design? 
    • How do you engage both interviewees and stakeholders in a project? 
    • What worked? What didn’t? What should be the takeaway from these efforts? 

2021 Summer Workshop: The Education Opportunity – Primary Sources and Context in the K-12 Classroom

Thursday, July 8, 2021, 1:00-4:00 PM (EST)

Virtual workshop on Zoom

Registration: $25

This workshop is for archivists and custodians of primary source materials who wish to increase the visibility and sound use of their holdings to educators. Participants will engage with multiple primary sources from a single collection to learn how to connect archival literacy with the creation of turnkey resources for educators. This workshop will help custodians of primary sources think critically about their collections as they relate to state education curriculum standards and broaden their potential K-12 audience. Participants will learn of unique strategies and resources currently applied in the classroom from the teachers who are currently using them as a means to foster discussion regarding how archival outreach might be enhanced at the K-12 level.    

Instructor: Amanda Smith, Jena Sibille, Mike Santrock

Register here